Reimaanlok - Looking to the Future: Strengthening Natural Resource Management in Atoll Communities in the Republic of Marshall Islands Employing Integrated Approaches

Summary

As a Small Island Developing State (SIDS), the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) has a strong dependence on natural resource and biodiversity not only for food and income. The Marshallese relationship with the islands forms the basis of its culture and way of life which has developed in harmony over thousands of years. In the face of global threats, RMI still has pristine waters and coral reefs that contribute to ecosystem services and livelihoods. In recognition of the importance of its natural assets, RMI together with other SIDS responded to global conservation targets through the Micronesian Challenge and specifically for its part, its prepared Reimaanlok to serve as a clear roadmap of the way forward. 

This project aims to support operationalising the Reimaanlok - the National Conservation Area Plan, adopted in 2008 to effectively conserve at least 30% of the nearshore marine resources and 20% of the terrestrial resources across Micronesia by 2020. The project objective is to sustain atoll biodiversity and livelihoods by building community and ecosystem resilience to threats and degrading influences through integrated management of terrestrial and coastal resources. The principles and processes outlined in Reimaanlok will be implemented in 5 islands/atolls, the lessons from which will guide replication in other sites. 

Objective

The project objective is to sustain biodiversity and livelihoods by building community and ecosystem resilience to threats and degrading influences through integrated management of terrestrial and coastal resources in priority atolls/islands.

In order to achieve this, and based on the barrier analysis outlined in the Project Document, which identified: a) the problems being addressed by the project, b) its root causes, and c) the barriers to overcome in order to actually address the problem and its root causes, the project’s intervention has been organized in three components, under which three ‘outcomes’ are expected.

  1. Expanding and sustaining RMI protected area network
  2. Improved governance for integrated atoll management 
  3. Knowledge management 

Who finances it?



Global Environment Facility   USD $3,927,981

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